Climate Change | atlanticcanadaoffshore.ca

Climate Change

Offshore oil and natural gas operators in Atlantic Canada are committed to working with policy makers and other stakeholders to address the global challenge of climate change.

This includes working with and supporting governments in achieving governments’ net zero goals, and finding new and innovative ways to reduce emissions.

Atlantic Canada’s four offshore oil production projects, were responsible for about 0.64% of total Canadian emissions and 1.84% of total oil and gas extraction sector emissions in Canada in 2019.

According to data from the Government of Canada and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Atlantic Canada’s four offshore oil production projects, all located in Newfoundland and Labrador, were responsible for about 0.64% of total Canadian emissions and 1.84% of total oil and gas extraction sector emissions in Canada in 2019. This is due in part to the resource itself and also due to the efficiency of producing projects, including efforts in recent years to reduce flaring and manage emissions through preventative maintenance and other proactive measures. There are exciting opportunities for potential new projects in the region to adopt new technologies to further lower their carbon footprints.

The world will need oil and natural gas for the foreseeable future due to increasing demand for all forms of energy globally. Production of Atlantic Canada’s offshore resources, which are amongst the least carbon intense in the world, can help meet growing global demand for energy while helping to reduce global net greenhouse gas emissions.

Here are some examples of actions the offshore oil and gas industry in Atlantic Canada has taken to manage and reduce greenhouse gas emissions:

  • Reducing flaring.
  • Focusing on operational efficiencies and preventative maintenance, which in turn lead to reduced energy consumption, including improving efficiency of power generation units and other key equipment.
  • Implementing fugitive emissions monitoring systems that use optical gas imaging cameras, facilitating rapid leak detection and repair.
  • Using fuel management and monitoring systems on supply vessels to ensure vessels are operating as efficiently as possible. 
  • Electrifying key pieces of equipment, such as cranes and batteries.
  • Digitalization, including movement to onshore control centres.
  • Supporting research and development, including projects in the areas of use of alternative low carbon fuels in marine transportation, new flare reduction technologies. Learn more about research, demonstration and development projects currently ongoing related to the Atlantic Canada offshore.